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FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

The following frequently asked questions have been addressed for your convenience.

What is a DLG?
What DLG do I use if I am teaching in a multi-grade classroom?
What do I do if the student can't read the theme book?
How do I determine a student's level for guided reading?
How do I determine the level of books for guided reading?
How do I determine which "Seedling" book for a student to read?
What other leveled books are available?
What if there is some portion of the Pathways program that I don't want to use?
Can I use a different spelling series?
Can I still use Reason for Wirting as my handwriting curriculum?
Does Daily Oral Language (DOL) cover all the grammar that my students need?
Can I use another title for the theme book?
Can I teach the themes in a different order?
Do I need a theme book for each student in the class?
Is the theme book the reading book?
Where do I find a list of skills that need to be taught in each grade?
How do I make grades for the report card?

What is a DLG?

A DLG is an acronym that means Daily Lesson Guide.  The DLG is a guide for teachers to plan theme book instruction including reading strategies, phonics/focus on words lessons, spelling, handwriting, and grammar activities. (BACK TO TOP)
 

What DLG do I use if I am teaching in a multi-grade classroom?

In first and second grade it is important to teach the target skills in each theme in sequential order because of the skill progression. In third grade and up, students in different grades can be grouped together using one theme book. If this is done, activities may need to be differentiated to meet the learning level of the students. It is also important to cover the target skills for each grade level to assure coverage of essential skills. A compilation of target skills for each theme in each grade level is provided on the website to assist the Multigrade teacher with planning.  (BACK TO TOP)

 

What do I do if the student can’t read the theme book?

If a student cannot read the theme book independently support needs to be available. For example, the student could listen to the book on tape while following along in the text or the student could be paired with a student who is capable of reading the theme book.  However, it is important that theme book instruction does not replace guided reading. All students receive guided reading instruction on their instructional level.  (BACK TO TOP)

 

How do I determine a student’s level for guided reading?

Many options are available for determining a student’s reading level. Jerry L. John’s Basic Reading Inventory is available with Pathways for assessing students. Any assessment program you are currently using may continue to be utilized.  (BACK TO TOP)

 

How do I determine the level of books for guided reading?

Many books have the reading level noted on the book. See the guided reading section of this website to find detailed information on websites and books that can be used for leveling books.  (BACK TO TOP)

 

How do I determine which “Seedling” book for a student to read?

The Seedling books are leveled in two ways: the Fountas & Pinnell Guided Reading Leveling System and Reading Recovery Levels. Choose books that are appropriate for the students’ reading level. There are many choices of titles and topics available on each level.The chart below correlates Guided Reading Leveling and Reading Recovery Levels with Seedling.

Seedling Levels

 

Guided Reading Levels

 

Reading Recovery® Levels

Early Emergent   A–D   1–5
Emergent   D–E   5–8
Early Fluent   F–G   8–12
Fluent   G–J
  11–20
Transitional*   J–L   17-24

(BACK TO TOP)
 

What other leveled books are available?

Any reading materials may be used for guided reading once the level of the material is determined. Several companies publish leveled materials for guided reading. Use caution in choosing materials since many do not meet the criteria for materials acceptable for Seventh-day Adventist schools. See the guided reading section of this website for more information.  (BACK TO TOP)

 

What if there is some portion of the Pathways program that I don’t want to use?

Pathways is designed as an integrated language arts program and is most successfully used as a total program. If a portion of it is not used, there will be a gap in the students’ learning. So, if there is a portion of Pathways that you do not use, be sure to supplement other materials in its place.  (BACK TO TOP)

 

Can I use a different spelling series?

One of the strengths of Pathways is having everything available for all language arts instruction in one package. A different spelling series may be used if the objectives match the scope and sequence of Pathways.  (BACK TO TOP)

 

Can I still use Reason for Writing as my handwriting curriculum?

Again, one of the strengths of Pathways is having everything available for all language arts instruction in one package.  Carefully consider using the Pathways handwriting for your own ease of planning.  (BACK TO TOP)

 

Does Daily Oral Language (DOL) cover all the grammar that my students need?

DOL was designed to meet all the objectives in the Pathways Scope and Sequence. While teaching the DOL, take every opportunity to teach any and all grammar that may apply to the sentence of that day. Grammar is also taught through writing workshop and some theme book activities.  If all this is done, no additional grammar instruction is necessary.  (BACK TO TOP)

 

Can I use another title for the theme book?            

The DLG is written specifically for the chosen theme book. It would be easiest to use the chosen title. Also keep in mind that the theme books have been carefully chosen to meet specific criteria for Seventh-day Adventist schools. However, once you are familiar with the Pathways strategies they can be used with any book.  (BACK TO TOP)
 

Can I teach the themes in a different order?

In first and second grade, the themes need to be taught in order because the skills are closely tied to the theme book activities. In third grade and up the order of the themes may be changed. If the theme books are not taught in order, be sure to follow the proper sequence for word study, spelling, and handwriting.  (BACK TO TOP)

 

Do I need a theme book for each student in the class?

It is recommended that a copy of the theme book be purchased for each student. First grade is the only grade that individual student copies may not be necessary. However, we want students to learn to love books, have books in their own hands, and interact with the books. Therefore, even first graders will benefit by having their own copy.  (BACK TO TOP)

 

Is the theme book the reading book?

The theme book is used for teaching various reading skills and strategies. It is not a reading book such as a traditional basal reader. Students may participate in theme book activities with or without support regardless of their reading level. Specific instruction for decoding and fluency needs to be taught separately with additional materials for guided reading. If the theme book matches a student’s instructional level, it may be used for guided reading.  (BACK TO TOP)

 

Where do I find a list of skills that need to be taught in each grade?

The Pathways Scope and Sequence is located in the back of the Teacher’s Manual. It outlines the target skills that are to be taught at each grade level. In addition to the scope and sequence, target skills taught in each theme study are noted in the Daily Lesson Guides.  (BACK TO TOP)

 

How do I make grades for the report card?

Rubrics can be used to assign point values for most activities. The points can then be converted to a letter grade if necessary. Checklists are a valuable way to track students’ progress also. Additional information for reporting grades will be provided by the reading steering committee. Please continue to check this website and with your local conference office of education regarding grades.  (BACK TO TOP)



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